Medslant Acid Reflux Newsletter

Gerd And Left Side Sleeping

For quite some time I have been reporting to you that research recommends left side sleeping as the best positioning for help with acid reflux. There are three studies that support this. In one study in The Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology scientists took healthy subjects, fed them high fat meals to induce heartburn, and immediately after the meals had the subjects lie on either their left or right side while devices measured esophageal acidity. They found reflux time significantly greater when subjects were on their right side. And, "average overall acid clearance was significantly prolonged with right side down".

Another study published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology, showed the same result - right side sleeping tends to aggravate heartburn.

Both of these studies were done on a relatively small number of people.

A third study which I have told you about before, looked at 100 studies narrowed down from more than 2000 over a ten year period. This one looked at food choices, lifestyle choices, timing of eating, and sleep position. The conclusion is that while there is physiologic evidence that tobacco, alcohol, and certain foods may adversely affect symptoms of reflux, there is not a lot of evidence that cessation will improve reflux. As for sleep position, the conclusion is that left side sleeping prevents acid from going back up into the esophagus.

This study, authored by Tonya Kaltenbach MD, Seth Crockett MD, and Lauren B. Gerson MD, concludes that the two best lifestyle choices for help with acid reflux are to achieve and maintain a healthy weight and to sleep in an elevated position on your left side.

Stomach sleeping is never recommended for people with acid reflux, sleep apnea or any other breathing or sleep related problem. The reasoning is that you do not want to put extra pressure on your stomach.

The best approach is to use this information exactly for what it is - information only - and to consult your physician or other health care professional for advice about you.

Ppi Use And Second Heart Attacks

The dangers of prolonged PPI use continue to be told. The news is enough to stress one into acid reflux. I previously told you about a study conducted at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston that confirmed that hospital patients taking PPIs had an increased risk of C. difficile infection. Now, a study conducted in Denmark and published in the September, 2010 Annals of Internal Medicine, says that patients who have already had a heart attack and take PPIs are 30% more likely to experience a second attack. Andrew L. Rubman, ND, a contributing editor to Daily Health News, explained that PPIs skew nutrient absorption, may impede liver function and alter the balance of bacteria in the intestines. This can make the heart more vulnerable to inflammation, arthythmia and oxygen starvation. Once again, use this for information only and be sure to consult your own physician about your own care.

Safe Travel Tips

We're all aware of many tips for safe, healthy traveling and holiday get togethers like not over indulging in lots of fatty food, alcohol, etc. But there are a few suggestions from experts like those at the Harvard School of Public Health and Drowsydriving.org, a National Sleep Foundation Organization member that we may not have thought about.

Carry a small package of disinfectant wipes and a 3 oz (TSA approved size) hand sanitizer. Bacteria and germs abound in public places and you don't want what someone else has.

Remember the 20/20/20 rule for helping prevent eye strain: every 20 minutes spend 20 seconds looking at something 20 feet away. I know, difficult if you are the driver but easy if you are reading or looking at a computer while flying.

Take a break from driving if you can. Drowsy driving causes 100,000 accidents a year. If you are driving, every few hours try to find a safe place where you can stop, stretch your legs, breathe in some fresh air, maybe even take a 5-10 minute stretch your legs walk, or catch a 10-15 minute nap.

Take a walk and stretch your legs - if you are sitting on a plane, train, or bus for more than an hour, take a short walk up and down the aisle.

Please keep the emails and phone calls coming to customerservice@medslant.com and 1.800.346.1850. I love hearing from you.

Wishing you a good night's sleep,

Adele


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The MedSlant wedge pillow helps relieve the symptoms of Acid Reflux, heartburn, GERD, acid indigestion, sinus congestion, Gastroesophogeal Reflux, etc. for a healthier, more restful good night's sleep. The content provided here is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your physician(s). Please consult your physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.